Session 3 Response to Prompts

A. Download the interactionsmatrix.doc file. Note that this is a table listing the three types of interactions at the top, with some sample activities on the left. Place an X in the cells to indicate which activities correspond to which interactions. Add some additional activities of your own and mark the cells appropriate to the types of interactions each represents.

Interactions

B. Discuss of the types of interactions that are most often used in the content area for which you expect to design instruction. Be sure to explain the content area, the types of students and types of objectives with which you will be working.

As the courses I will be designing do not involve an instructor, the Learner-Instructor interactions will be conspicuously absent.  In addition, there are difficulties with enabling Learner-Learner interactions within the courses I will be designing.  While I would love to engender a community of inquiry with participants dedicated to sharing and enhancing their training and education, the fear that such an open forum could become an off-topic “gripe space” is all too real.  As such, the positive benefits of having a shared learning space are greatly outweighed by the negative potential for unfavorable comments.  Just one unfavorable comment (posted by a customer inappropriately using the space to express dissatisfaction) has the potential to sour the attitudes of every visitor that sees the comment.  For our organization, our relationships with the learners (our distributors) are key to our business.  This means that removing any comment could cause a good customer to feel slighted, thus chasing our customer into the waiting arms of one of our competitors.

Connie Malamed has an e-Learning podcast that I enjoy listening to, and on the second episode of her podcast, The E-Learning Coach, she has a guest who discusses the pitfalls I just mentioned as they relate to the use of social networking sites for learner-to-learner interactions in corporate e-learning: http://theelearningcoach.com/podcasts/2/

The types of interactions that I will be using exclusively, then, are those of the Learner – Content family.  I will be using videos, animations, text presentations with audio narrations, and various narrated interactive activities (learning games, branching scenarios / simulations, drag-and-drop interactions) as a way to engage learners.  The primary learning  objectives of these interactions will be “Decide” objectives, along with each of the enabling “Know”, “Believe”, and “Feel” objectives sprinkled throughout the courses.  The content will involve the properties and characteristics of selected rigging hardware and their safe and proper use.  The learners will be individuals involved in the rigging and lifting industry who are already familiar with much of the basic terminology and many of the procedures used in rigging today.

I will be constructing these interactions using Articulate Storyline.  In Learner-content interactions and learning effectiveness: A study of student perceptions , the study concluded that “…the participants indicated that a combination of various types of content presentation was the most effective catalyst to their learning, compared with single-media presentations. They also indicated that text-based online content ranked lowest in terms of motivation and engagement in learning.”  I am continuously trying to leverage the interactivity and programmable features of Articulate Storyline to present my content in a more dynamic and engaging way.

 

C. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 of the Horton text discuss three categories of activities: Absorb, Do, and Connect. After reading these chapters you are to locate one or more online classes and identify one Absorb, one Do and one Connect activity. 

Absorb:

URL: http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/blooms-taxonomy-and-assessments.html#lesson
Course Content: Bloom’s Taxonomy and Assessments
Intended Students/Probable Student Characteristics: Teachers, instructional designers, students interested in educational psychology or educational pedagogy
Instructor Characteristics: The developer of the presentation was someone who possessed a good understanding of the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy
Identify the Type of Activity: Absorb – Do – Connect

“ABSORB”

Identify and Discuss the Interactions in the Activity: A narrated video explains the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy using a combination of animations, illustrations, and textABSORB

Do:

URL: http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/blooms-taxonomy-and-assessments.html#qz
Course Content: Bloom’s Taxonomy and Assessments
Intended Students/Probable Student Characteristics: Teachers, instructional designers, students interested in educational psychology or educational pedagogy
Instructor Characteristics: The developer of the quiz was someone who possessed at least a fair understanding of the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy
Identify the Type of Activity: Absorb – Do – Connect

“DO”

Identify and Discuss the Interactions in the Activity: The activity is a “quiz”, which falls into the category of “DO” activities (although, when such a “DO” activity is graded, I suppose it becomes a “TEST”).  The learner interacts with a multiple choice test that can be taken at any time.DO

Connect:

URL: http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/blooms-taxonomy-and-assessments.html#transcript
Course Content: Bloom’s Taxonomy and Assessments
Intended Students/Probable Student Characteristics: Teachers, instructional designers, students interested in educational psychology or educational pedagogy
Instructor Characteristics: This activity is not let by an instructor, nor do I imagine it was created by one.  This might even be considered a bit of a “stretch” as a Connect activity.
Identify the Type of Activity: Absorb – Do – Connect

“CONNECT”

Identify and Discuss the Interactions in the Activity: At the bottom of the transcript is a “Do you like this? [YES] [NO]” interaction which provides the user with the opportunity to evaluate the lesson.CONNECT_2If the [YES] button is clicked, the learner is asked to provide an explanation of why they liked that lesson.  It is in this space that the learner can describe why, and possibly connect the learned information to the reason why they liked it (applicability to their job, their life, etc.).CONNECT
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13 comments on “Session 3 Response to Prompts
  1. Michelle says:

    Hey Matthew!

    Another great set of responses. While I found everything well done, the comment you made that resonated with me the most was:

    “Just one unfavorable comment (posted by a customer inappropriately using the space to express dissatisfaction) has the potential to sour the attitudes of every visitor that sees the comment. For our organization, our relationships with the learners (our distributors) are key to our business. This means that removing any comment could cause a good customer to feel slighted, thus chasing our customer into the waiting arms of one of our competitors.”

    As a teacher of AP Statistics, this is the exact idea that I try to communicate to my students when we talk about voluntary response bias. The people at the extremes of the spectrum are most likely to respond and it’s those with negative opinions that are most likely to share.

    The e-Learning podcast that you shared is going into my set of materials to use next year when we cover that topic.

    Thanks for giving me another real world example!

    Michelle

    • Thanks, Michelle! I am pretty disheartened that I can’t think of a good way to build a community of inquiry. I’d love for my learners to be able to communicate with one another, especially given the effectiveness of leaner-leaner interactions. I did find one source, however, that didn’t mention learner-learner interaction in its list of critical factors that affect the perceived satisfaction of learners in an e-learning context:

      http://ebiz.bm.nsysu.edu.tw/2009/m954011064/references/20081206sun2006.pdf

      Maybe I just need to concentrate on those for my courses, and stop worrying about the social part of the constructivist approach…

  2. Hi! Matthew:
    Thank your interesting post. I like these graphs of Absorb, Do, and Connect. These graphs help me to understand theory easily. Your post is a good job.
    Best,
    Tsai Hsieh Heng

  3. Limin Yan says:

    Excellent job! Especially the part C. Actually I follow the way you did it!

  4. Chun Yi Huang says:

    Hi Matthew,
    I love your post. That’s very clearly and organic especially your part C.
    There are graphs of absorb/ do/ connect including very detail and explanation.
    Thanks for reply.

    Chun Yi Huang

  5. hyesu19888 says:

    HI Matthew,
    Whenever I read your post, I feel proud of you as a classmate and also there are a lot I should learn from you. Especially, the answer for N.3 question is really well organized and it is easy to understand. Thank you for great posts every week!

    • Thanks, Hye!

      I appreciate your comment. I’m a very visual learner, so in order for things to make sense to me, I have to construct them in a visual way. I’m glad my style is helpful to you!

  6. Jenny says:

    Hi Matthew,
    regarding the information of the podcast that reports a lack of effectiveness in using social networks as learner-learner interaction. Does that only apply for the corporate world? What if the learner has very limited technological experience and social interaction through Facebook, as per say, is all they know? What other options do instructors have, aside from a class blog?

    • Hi Jenny!

      For instructors teaching a formal class, I think the issues would be different. Students complaining about a course on a discussion board would be bad form, and I think it would be rare if the instructor established a presence on the board. On the other hand, for corporations who use social networking, there is a great risk that one unhappy customer could poison the well, as it were.
      Another option for instructors might include the creation of a more dynamic web site – something that is more than just a blog, maybe the way Blackboard works, or perhaps a site that just hasn’t been written yet! Who knows what will be available in the next 5 years!

      Thanks for your comment!

  7. newberryBrian says:

    Very impressive response!

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